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Serratus Posterior Inferior
Pointer Plus

Pointer Plus

The Pointer Plus is an easy to use trigger point (TP) locator which incorporates a push button stimulation feature to immediately treat Trigger point pain.

The Serratus Posterior Inferior is a muscle of the thoracic region of the back.

Anatomical Attachments:

  • Origin: Attaches to the spinous processes of T11 and T12, L1, L2 and L3 and the supraspinal ligament.
  • Insertion: Attaches to the secondary margin of the lower 4 ribs just medial to their angles.

Action: Stabilizes the lower ribs and pulls them inferior and posterior, acting in expiration.

Synergist: Iliocostalis and Longissimus thoracis, Quadratus lumborum.

 

Nerve Supply: Anterior primary rami of T10, T11, and T12.

Vascular supply: Posterior intercostal arteries.

Travell and Simons Trigger Point Pain Referral:  

Click on a small image to view an enlarged image

 

Trigger Point Signs and Symptoms: Persistent deep aching in inferior thoracic region of the back.

Trigger Point Activating and Perpetuating Factors: Hyperextension of the spine with persistent abduction of the arms, leg length inequality, Scoliosis.

Differential Diagnosis: (Segmental, Subluxation, Somatic dysfunction) T10 T11 or T12 radiculopathy, Thoracic spine Hyperkyphosis, Scoliosis, Rib Subluxation/Dislocation, Slipping rib syndrome, Costochondritis, Sprain/Strain syndrome of the mid-back, Caliectasis, Pyelonephritis, Ureteral reflux, Renal calculi (Kidney stones), Kidney infection, Renal cancer, Polymyalgia rheumatica, Fibromyalgia, Polymyositis, Systemic lupus erythematosus, Ankylosing spondylitis, Osteoarthritis, Osteoporosis, Herpes Zoster (Shingles), Systemic infections or inflammation, Nutritional inadequacy, Metabolic imbalance, Toxicity, Side effects of medication.

 

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