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Pyramidalis

Pointer Plus

Pointer Plus

The Pointer Plus is an easy to use trigger point (TP) locator which incorporates a push button stimulation feature to immediately treat Trigger point pain.

The Pyramidalis is a muscle of the abdomen.

The abdominal muscles are frequently referred to as the Abs.

Anatomical Attachments:

  • Origin: Attaches to the fibers from the anterior surface of the pubis and the pubic ligament.
  • Insertion: Attaches on the linea alba midway between the umbilicus and the symphysis pubis.

Action: Compresses the abdomen and supports viscera, active on forced exhalation.

Nerve Supply: Muscular branches of the subcostal Thoracic nerve (T12).

Vascular supply: Inferior epigastric artery.

Travell and Simons Trigger Point Pain Referral:  

 

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Trigger Point Signs and Symptoms: The deep aching pain experienced between the naval and the pubic symphysis, suggest in females gynecological involvement. In both genders, due to the tenderness upon palpation, intestinal blockage or constipation, which has been unresponsive to laxatives, may be suspected.

Trigger Point Activating and Perpetuating Factors: Abdominal scars from surgery, acute trauma, chronic occupational strain, over exercise, emotional tension, viral infections, straining during fecal elimination, severe constipation, poor posture.

Differential Diagnosis: (Segmental, Subluxation, Somatic dysfunction) T10 T11 or T12 radiculopathy, Menses, Cervicitis, Cervical cancer, Cervical cyst, Pelvic inflammatory disease, Pregnancy, Spontaneous abortion (Miscarriage), Inguinal hernia, Umbilical hernia, Sprain/Strain of the rectus abdominis, Bladder infection, Fecal impaction, Constipation, Flatus, Polyps, Ascites, Colon cancer, Bladder infection, Pinworms, Tapeworms, Food poisoning, Systemic infections or inflammation, Nutritional inadequacy, Metabolic imbalance, Toxicity, Side effects of medication.

 

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